Walls of Jerusalem and Lake Adelaide Circuit

king davids peak and lake Salome from mount jerusalem

king davids peak and lake Salome from mount jerusalem

The Walls of Jerusalem in Tasmania's Central Highlands is a popular destination for a relatively doable overnight wilderness camping experience.

It is a spectacular location with a number of rugged peaks and numerous glacially formed lakes (tarns). It is reasonably accessible for a one or two night trip.

solomons jewels near to wild dog creek campsite

solomons jewels near to wild dog creek campsite

However, the plateau on which the Walls sit averages around 1200m of elevation with peaks being up to 1500m. Compared to an average Tasmanian day walk it is isolated and potentially prone to exposure so you must go well prepared at all times of the year.

the weather can change quickly on the central plateau

the weather can change quickly on the central plateau

We had a serious dump of snow on one visit a couple of years ago in early January (i.e. Australian summer).

king davids peak

king davids peak

The Walls are a number of tall dolerite peaks which form a natural amphitheatre which surrounds a grassy region dotted with tarns and pencil pines and other features. Consistent with the biblical theme the Walls are entered through different gates with Herod's Gate being just beyond the campsite.

duck board inside the walls site just beyond herods gate

duck board inside the walls site just beyond herods gate

Most people walk into the Walls, camp for one or two nights, and then walk back via the same route. We recently did a trip where we combined the Walls with Lake Adelaide in a circuit of around 25 kms.

solomons throne

solomons throne

We took 3 days and 2 nights. If you want to spend a day exploring the region within the Walls themselves add and extra day and night.

pencil pines

pencil pines

Its a 6.5km walk from the car park to the campsite at Wild dog Creek where you'll find camping platforms, water and a compost toilet.

camping platform wild dog creek

camping platform wild dog creek

On the way you'll pass Trappers Hut.

trappers hut

trappers hut

After overnighting at the campsite we walked through the Walls region, then out through a pencil pine forest, eventually reaching Dixon’s Kingdom – a hut built by highland cattleman Reg Dixon in 1950. This pre-dated the region being declared a national park and World Heritage Area.

pencil pine forest on track to dixons kingdom

pencil pine forest on track to dixons kingdom

dixons kingdom hut

dixons kingdom hut

From Dixon's kingdom we diverted briefly from our circuit to climb Mt Jerusalem for it's stunning views.

views from mount Jerusalem - cradle mountain and barn bluff in the distance

views from mount Jerusalem - cradle mountain and barn bluff in the distance

Resuming the circuit we headed to Balls Lake, past the Balls Lake Hut before reaching the northern end of Lake Adelaide where we camped for a second night.

eastern end of balls lake

eastern end of balls lake

balls lake track

balls lake track

balls lake hut

balls lake hut

Next morning, with clear blue skies, we followed the Junction Lake track past Stretcher Lake and Lake Loane to where we rejoined the main Walls of Jerusalem track and returned to the carpark.

Tasmanian waratahs western end balls lake

Tasmanian waratahs western end balls lake

lake adelaide

lake adelaide

campsite lake adelaide

campsite lake adelaide

We think that this circuit walk is a good alternative to the usual retracing route and offers some different vistas and fewer walkers.

junction lake track

junction lake track

stretcher lake

stretcher lake

king davids peak from junction lake track

king davids peak from junction lake track

lake loane

lake loane

For more detailed walking notes try the Tasmanian National Parks site

lake adelaide

lake adelaide

Cally